Climate and global changes

12 results

Geneviève Zabré: A determined young researcher

#WomensDay In September 2018, Geneviève Zabré, a young biologist from Burkina Faso, won first place in the international competition for French speakers called “My Thesis in 180 Seconds”. Her victory was due to a very remarkable presentation of her thesis work, supported in part by the IRD. Find out...

4 per 1000 initiative

Capturing carbon in the air and storing it in the ground to fight climate change: this is the goal of the ambitious 4 per 1000 strategy. This initiative, the subject of an international research programme , is mobilising several teams at the IRD.
falaise-de-glace_glacier-noir

The Achilles heel of Asia’s black glaciers

Why do Asian glaciers melt more slowly than others? Glaciologists are working on this phenomenon, focusing in particular on the many “black glaciers” in the region, covered in moraine debris. They reveal some of their specific characteristics and vulnerabilities.
recif-moorea-2018

The resistance of the Moorea corals

Experts in ocean ecology are investigating the health of coral reefs, put to the test by the increase in natural and anthropogenic disturbances. While there is growing concern about their overall future, certain reefs resist repeated attack, but however lose their diversity.
Flood in Morocco's Tafilalet Valley

Towards the intensification of extreme rainfall events in southern Europe

For the first time, a team including an IRD researcher studied the impact of climate change on extreme rainfall patterns in the entire Mediterranean region. This research is crucial to assessing the risk of severe flooding in this region.
Fruit trees and legumes combined with food crops

Carbon storage: what matters is the input!

After 15 years of climate smart agricultural practices in Madagascar, researchers are categorical: while these alternative methods help increase soil carbon storage, their effectiveness varies substantially. The assessment must therefore be carried out on the scale of the territory.
Root nodules of Discaria (Order: Rosales), a non-legume species capable of nitrogen-fixing symbiosis.

Nitrogen-fixing symbioses reveal themselves

Recent research has revealed the origin and evolution of symbiotic relationships between certain plants and soil bacteria in order to use atmospheric nitrogen. This knowledge could ultimately contribute to the development of sustainable agriculture minimising the use of chemical fertilisers.
Water run-off on degraded soil and gully erosion due to flooding, in the Mélé Haoussa basin in Niger

New hydroclimatic conditions in the Sahel

The latest figures on soil and climate help explain the enigmatic ups and downs observed in Sahelian hydrology for decades. Knowledge of the mechanisms involved paves the way for practical solutions to adapt agriculture to new environmental conditions.

Cultivating land for carbon

Soils from cultivated areas in tropical regions constitute largely underused carbon sinks. Increasing carbon stocks in soil has become critical to mitigate the effects of climate change but also increase soil fertility. What are the options?
Cowpea roots bear nodules which contain nitrogen-fixing bacteria.

Lipids that boost symbiosis

Certain legumes form a symbiotic relationship with bacteria! Tucked into their roots, these bacteria increase the crop yield of these plants. These bacteria, capable of producing lipid molecules known as hopanoids, therefore seem to provide a distinct advantage.
erosion-au-chili

Chile: a history of erosion

Chile is an ideal study site for geologists, due to its exceptional climate gradient. Over the past few hundred years, climate but also human activities have severely impacted soils in this country.
peche-el-nino

El Niño and weather hazards

The El Niño events of 2015 and 2016, heralded by similar early signs, had very divergent amplitudes. Their modelling highlights the importance of unpredictable high-frequency winds. The ability to predict the phenomenon is therefore severely limited.