Vignette
In the ocean, near a sandy bottom, a good-sized coelacanth faces a diver.

The new coelacanth has arrived?

Indonesian and French scientists have identified what they believe to be a new species of coelacanth, shedding light on the biogeographical mechanisms at the origin of the divergence between the populations known to date. The history of the evolution of this group of fish, little changed in...
Petites maisons colorées sur un bout de terre entourée de mer

Islands and island environments faced with global changes

Openness to the outside world, incorporation within the global economy but also the growth in natural risks and rising sea levels.... With their unique characteristics, often under threat, island environments and communities are today faced with unprecedented destabilising factors.

Health in Transition

It is no longer rare for inhabitants of the Global South to die from cancer or diabetes. In these regions, non-communicable diseases now cause more deaths than infectious ones. This is due to changing diets and new—more urban and industrialised—lifestyle habits. Populations must also cope with the...
Marilyne Bonnet, souriante, sur un fond végétal, posant à côté d'un panneau indiquant "Epicentre"

Maryline Bonnet: from humanitarian medicine to clinical research

Distinguished scientists do not always follow a traditional academic path. That is certainly true for Maryline Bonnet who just received the Christophe Mérieux Prize for her work fighting tuberculosis and HIV. She began her career as a practising pulmonologist travelling the globe to care for people...

The Challenges of the Sub-Saharan Urban Explosion

Sub-Saharan African cities are presently growing at a size and speed unprecedented in human history. This region of the continent, which was always very rural up to now, is becoming predominantly urban. Small, medium-sized and large cities are doubling in size year on year, with some growing by 1...

The old chief and the rain gauge

When instructions are taken very seriously
The fruit clusters of Coccoloba uvifera give it its nickname of sea grape.

Unwavering symbiosis

Research conducted on the introduction of a tree from extreme environments into the sand dunes of Senegal shows its solid relationship with a fungus. This fungus naturally accompanies the tree from its environment of origin, on the other side of the Atlantic.
Root nodules of Discaria (Order: Rosales), a non-legume species capable of nitrogen-fixing symbiosis.

Nitrogen-fixing symbioses reveal themselves

Recent research has revealed the origin and evolution of symbiotic relationships between certain plants and soil bacteria in order to use atmospheric nitrogen. This knowledge could ultimately contribute to the development of sustainable agriculture minimising the use of chemical fertilisers.
aedes-albopictus

The Asian tiger mosquito enjoys car journeys

Original research shows the role of car journeys in the spread of the Asian tiger mosquito in Europe. Accustomed to freight transportation, this invasive species also uses passenger vehicles to propagate. It is seemingly found in 5 out of 1,000 cars.
digue-d-atar

Malaria: P. vivax detected in the oasis of Atar

For the first time, the presence of the Plasmodium vivax parasite has been confirmed in Atar, northern Mauritania: it is responsible for most cases of malaria. It is therefore crucial to take every step to avoid an epidemic, not just in Mauritania but also in North Africa, or even beyond, notably in...